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JavaAppletTutorials

Java Applets Tutorials

     

  1. Applet
    An applet is a program written in the Java programming language that can be included in an HTML page, much in the same way an image is included in a page. When you use a Java technology-enabled browser to view a page that contains an applet, the applet's code is transferred to your system and executed by the browser's Java Virtual Machine (JVM). For information and examples on how to include an applet in an HTML page, refer to this description of the <APPLET> tag.
      
  2. Writing Applet
    This section describes how to use the API to which only applets have access. It covers sound, applet parameters, the <APPLET> tag, interapplet communication, and making requests to the browser. This section describes the characteristics of a high-quality applet. It includes Before You Ship That Applet, a checklist of some annoying behaviors you should avoid in your applet.
       
  3. Java Boutique
    This tutorial will take you step by step through the process of building applets. I have chosen for a Learn-By-Example method, the fastest way to learn. You will not learn the "Why" but the "How". Throughout the java tutorial all new lines of code are explained, the ones you have already seen aren't commented anymore. Within a few minutes you will be able to display things on the screen, a few minutes later you are able to use a GUI and after that you will see how to interact with the user. 
      
  4. Java Applet Tutorial
    This tutorial will take you step by step through the process of building applets. I have chosen for a Learn-By-Example method, the fastest way to learn. You will not learn the "Why" but the "How". Throughout the java tutorial all new lines of code are explained, the ones you have already seen aren't commented anymore. Within a few minutes you will be able to display things on the screen, a few minutes later you are able to use a GUI and after that you wil see how to interact with the user. If you don't know how to set up the Java Programming Environment, make sure to read Selena Sol's explanation about JDK first.
       
  5. Web Developer
    Okay, we still have a few more things to talk about before you actually build your own applet. However, I will introduce a simple applet so you can see what it would look like. Notice that we have to import the applet package.
       
  6. Convert a Java app into an applet
    Transforming a Java application to an applet can be either simple or difficult, depending on the requirements. At a minimum, every applet requires that at least one HTML page refer to it with suitable parameters; a Java-enabled browser to display that HTML page is needed as well. If you are using the applet only on your own machine, you can refer to this HTML page simply with a URL of the form.
       
  7. Java Introduction
    Java is a programming language. Developed in the years 1991 to 1994 by Sun Microsystems. Programs written in Java are called applets. The first browser that could show applets was introduced in 1994, as "WebRunner" - later known as "The HotJava Browser". You do not need to know Java to install applets on your pages. There are thousands of free applets available on the internet for almost any purpose. Most of them can be customized without programming.
        
  8. Still essential to Java
    When Java made its debut in January 1996, it was targeted at the client side. Back then, some believed that Web browsers would replace operating systems entirely and provide a new paradigm for end-user computing. While Web browsers have become part of our daily computing lives, operating systems are very much alive and needed, and Java hasn't lived up to its hype on the client side -- yet.
      

        

 

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Posted on: May 12, 2011

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