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  1. JGuru: Introduction to JavaServer Pages technology
    The Java Developer ConnectionSM (JDC) presents a Short Course written by JavaTM Software licensee jGuru (formerly named the MageLang Institute). This Short Course provides an introduction to JavaServer PagesTM (JSPTM) technology. jGuru has been dedicated to promoting the growth of the Java technology community through evangelism, education, and software since 1995. You can find out more about their activities, including community-driven FAQs and online learning.
      
  2. Fundamentals of Java Servlets 
    The Java Developer Connection (JDC) presents a Short Course on the Fundamentals of Java Servlets written by Java Software licensee, the MageLang Institute. A leading provider of Java technology training, MageLang has contributed regularly to the JDC since 1996. The MageLang Institute, since its founding in 1995, has been dedicated to promoting the growth of the Java technology community by providing excellent education and acting as an independent resource. To find out more about MageLang's Java technology training, visit the MageLang web site. 
      
  3. Java Server Pages Quick Start Guide
    The J2EE 1.4 Tutorial is a guide to developing enterprise applications for the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) version 1.4. Here we cover all the things you need to know to make the best use of this tutorial. This tutorial is intended for programmers who are interested in developing and deploying J2EE 1.4 applications on the Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8.2.
       
  4. Trail: Servlets
    A servlet is a Java programming language class used to extend the capabilities of servers that host applications accessed via a
    request-response programming model. Although servlets can respond to any type of request, they are commonly used to extend the applications hosted by Web servers. For such applications, Java Servlet technology defines HTTP-specific servlet classes.
     
  5. JavaServer Pages Fundamentals
    The Java Developer ConnectionSM (JDC) presents a Short Course written by JavaTM Software licensee jGuru (formerly named the MageLang Institute). This Short Course provides an introduction to JavaServer PagesTM (JSPTM) technology. JGuru has been dedicated to promoting the growth of the Java technology community through evangelism, education, and software since 1995. You can find out more about their activities, including community-driven FAQs and online learning, at jGuru.com.
      
  6. Servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSP) 1.0
    Servlets are Java technology's answer to CGI programming. They are programs that run on a Web server and build Web pages. Building Web pages on the fly is useful (and commonly done) for a number of reasons: 
    The Web page is based on data submitted by the user. For example the results pages from search engines are generated this way, and programs that process orders for e-commerce sites do this as well. 
    The data changes frequently. For example, a weather-report or news headlines page might build the page dynamically, perhaps returning a previously built page if it is still up to date. 
    The Web page uses information from corporate databases or other such sources. For example, you would use this for making a Web page at an on-line store that lists current prices and number of items in stock. 
      
  7. JSP by Example
    Welcome to the JavaServer PagesTM technology, the cross-platform method of generating dynamic content for the Web. If you have reached this learn-by-example trail, you are probably new to the technology. You might be a Web developer or enterprise developer who wants to use JavaServer Pages to develop dynamic Web applications. The steps in this trail contain a series of topics and sample code that teach you how to write JavaServer Pages applications. Each step illustrates a group of related principles. 
        
  8. JSP Tutorial
    If you do not have a JSP capable web-server (sometimes known as application servers for configuration reasons), the first step is to download one. There are many such servers available, most of which can be downloaded for free evaluation and/or development. Some of them are: 
    Blazix from Desiderata Software (1.5 Megabytes, JSP, Servlets and EJBs) 
    TomCat from Apache (6.7 Megabytes) 
    WebLogic from BEA Systems (44 Megabytes, JSP, Servlets and EJBs) 
    WebSphere from IBM (105 Megabytes, JSP, Servlets and EJBs)
        
  9. Intro to JSP
    Choosing a server-side language used to be easy. Way back when, CGI was pretty much the only scripting option out there. Intrepid developers could write their own server extensions, but few were up to the challenge, and the gap between these two options (inefficient CGI scripts and extremely complex server extension development) was huge.Microsoft tried to fill this hole with Active Server Pages (ASP), which allow developers to use simple scripting to access the server and its extensions. But while ASP gives you an efficient way to return dynamic content, it essentially limits you to Microsoft platforms, and even the simplest of scripting mistakes can cause the server to crash or hang, effectively bringing down your website.
        
  10. Servlet Essentials
    This document explains the concepts of Java Servlets and provides a step-by-step tutorial for writing HTTP Servlets with complete source code for the example Servlets. The tutorial and the other chapters cover all facets of Servlet programming from a simple "Hello World" Servlet to advanced Servlet features like session tracking and Cookies. There are also appendices on compiling and running Servlets. The reader is assumed to have some basic knowledge of HTML and Java programming.
           
  11. Servlets and JSP
    This tutorial is now available as a book: Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages by Marty Hall, published by Sun Microsystems Press. Read all about it at CoreServlets.com Server-Side Web Applications using Java Servlets versions 2.1/2.2 and JavaServer Pages (JSP) version 1.0.All source code freely available for unrestricted use. Created for work in the Research and Technology Development Center of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, for courses in the Johns Hopkins Part-Time MS Program in Computer Science, and for various industry seminars and on-site Java short courses. Please note that this is a first draft of the tutorial, so please send corrections, comments, and suggestions to me at hall@apl.jhu.edu. Reprinted with permission from the author. Click here to visit the original version.
     
        
  12. A Brief Introduction to Servlets and JSP
    In this article we will discuss only HTTP servlets and hence when we mention servlet we mean HTTP Servlet.A Servlet, in simple terms, is a Java program running under a web server taking a 'request' object as an input and responding back by a 'response' object. Typically a web browser will send the request in HTTP format. The servlet container will convert that into a request object. Similarly the response object - populated by the servlet is converted into an HTTP response by the servlet container. 
      
  13. Developing JavaServer Pages (JSP)
    The Application Server supports a powerful, new approach to dynamic page content: JavaServer Pages (JSP). The JSP function in the Application Server is release-level code that is based on an early version of the Sun Microsystems JSP Specification.JSP is an easy-to-use solution for generating HTML pages with dynamic content. A JSP file contains combinations of HTML tags, NCSA tags (special tags that were the first method of implementing server-side includes), <SERVLET> tags, and JSP syntax. JSP files have the extension .jsp. The DisplayData.JSP file in A sample JSP file provides an example.
     

          















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Posted on: May 12, 2011

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