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Java server Faces Books

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Java server Faces JavaServer Faces, or JSF, brings a component-based model to web application development that's similar to the model that's been used in standalone GUI applications for years. The technology builds on the experience gained from Java Serv

Java server Faces Books

       

  1. Java server Faces
    JavaServer Faces, or JSF, brings a component-based model to web application development that's similar to the model that's been used in standalone GUI applications for years. The technology builds on the experience gained from Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages, and numerous commercial and open source web application frameworks that simplify the development process. In JavaServer Faces, developers learn how to use this new framework to build real-world web applications. The book contains everything you'll need: how to construct the HTML on the front end; how to create the user interface components that connect the front end to your business objects; how to write a back-end that's JSF-friendly; and how to create the deployment descriptors that tie everything together.
       

  2. Core Java server Faces
    This is the support web site for the Sun Microsystems Press book Core JavaServer Faces. For evaluation purposes, we invite you to look at PDF files that represent the last pages before the book went to print. There are a few minor typos in some of the files, but otherwise they are identical to the printed book. Note: Because of bandwidth limitations, we had to remove the links to the more specialized chapters.) You may not redistribute this material under any circumstances. Please don't post the files on other web sites. Don't print the book except for your own evaluation. If you like what you see, please buy the book, and consider writing a positive review on Amazon. We enjoy writing, but we also need to make a living. 
       

  3. JavaServer Faces in Action Book Excerpt
    JavaServer Faces In Action helps front-end developers, back-end developers, and architects understand how they can get the most out of JavaServer Faces technology. It guides developers to the new official standard for simplifying Java web development, and explains what JavaServer Faces technology is, how it works, and how it relates to other frameworks and technologies like Struts, Servlets, Portlets, JavaServer Pages (JSP), and JSTL. In addition, this book covers the standard components, renderers, converters, and validators, along with advice on how to use them to create solid applications. The building of complete JavaServer Faces applications is demonstrated with an in-depth case study covering complex user interface layouts, prototyping, and integrating templates with back-end model objects. 
       

  4. Manning Java server Faces in Action
    JavaServer Faces helps streamline your web development through the use of UI components and events (instead of HTTP requests and responses). JSF components (buttons, text boxes, checkboxes, data grids, etc.) live between user requests, which eliminates the hassle of maintaining state. JSF also synchronizes user input with application objects, automating another tedious aspect of web development.JavaServer Faces in Action is an introduction, a tutorial, and a handy reference. With the help of many examples, the book explains what JSF is, how it works, and how it relates to other frameworks and technologies like Struts, Servlets, Portlets, JSP, and JSTL. It provides detailed coverage of standard components, renderers, converters, and validators, and how to use them to create solid applications. This book will help you start building JSF solutions today.
         

  5. Pro JSF: Building Rich Internet Components
    Pro JSFshows you how to leverage the full potential of JavaServer Faces. This is not an entry-level tutorial, but a book about building effective JSF components for sophisticated, enterprise-level Rich Internet Applications. Written by JSF experts and verified by established community figures-including Adam Winer (member of the JSF Expert Group, Java Champion), Kito D. Mann (JSFCentral.com and JSF in Action), and Matthias We?endorf (MyFaces)-this JSF 1.2-compliant book provides reliable and groundbreaking JSF components to help you exploit the power of JSF in your Java web applications. This book provides a blueprint for building custom JSF UI components and shows how to leverage the best browser technologies, such as AJAX, Mozilla XUL and Microsoft HTC, to deliver Rich Internet Applications. This book covers standard best practices for behavioral and renderer-specific component classes, renderers, events and event listeners, and JSP tag handlers for each. It also covers advanced techniques such as dynamic content type negotiation, JAR-based resource delivery, and dynamic render kit selection.
       

  6. Server-side Java technology resources 
    Java Server Faces pays attention to the details that are crucial to any real application, such as working with tablular data and enabling and disabling features based on runtime conditions. This book also includes advanced topics, like creating custom components and renderers as well as how to develop custom presentation layers as an alternative to the standard JSP-based presentation layer. Whether you're a beginner or an expert, you'll find everything you need to know about JSF in this book. 
      

  7. Bookpool Java server Faces
    JavaServer Faces, or JSF, brings a component-based model to web application development that's similar to the model that's been used in standalone GUI applications for years. The technology builds on the experience gained from Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages, and numerous commercial and open source web application frameworks that simplify the development process. In JavaServer Faces, developers learn how to use this new framework to build real-world web applications. The book contains everything you'll need: how to construct the HTML on the front end; how to create the user interface components that connect the front end to your business objects; how to write a back-end that's JSF-friendly; and how to create the deployment descriptors that tie everything together. 
       

  8. Test-Driving the JSF 1.2
    At this time, the official JSF 1.2 RI implementation has not been released. However, the beta version is currently being distributed with the Glassfish Java EE 5 application server (also a beta). Although the 1.2 RI is a beta, it?s in very good condition and it?s quite ready for test-driving to understand how it might fit the requirements for future projects. The project template introduced here contains Jar files for a sample application that allows the test-driving of JSF 1.2 and Facelets under Tomcat 5.5. Tomcat is a familiar servlet container to use without having to deal with a new application server like Glassfish. Although this latest version of Tomcat still doesn?t support JSP 2.1, which is required by JSF 1.2, Facelets adds this piece for us.
        

  9. JSF in Action: JavaServer Faces (JSF) with Struts, Shale and Facelets
    This intensive JavaServer Faces (JSF) training course is designed and developed by Kito Mann, author of the best selling JSF book JavaServer Faces in Action and founder and Editor-in-Chief of JSFCentral.com, a site devoted to the JavaServer Faces community. This is training from the source.This JSF course begins by explaining what JavaServer Faces is, and how it relates to Struts and other web frameworks currently on the market. You will learn about key JSF concepts, and some of the architectural principals behind the framework. You will then learn about IDEs that support JSF, as well as libraries that facilitate JSF development, such as Struts Shale and Facelets. You will also learn about the current market for off-the-shelf user interface components, such as grids, menus, toolbars, trees, and tabbed panes. 
      

  10. Introduction to Java sever Faces
    This article is meant to acquaint the reader with JavaServer Faces, commonly known as JSF. JSF technology simplifies building the user interface for web applications. It does this by providing a higher-level framework for working with your web app, representing the page as event-aware components rather than raw markup. At this time, there are two JSF variants: JSF early access 4 (which is included in the Java Web Services Developer Pack 1.3), and JSF 1.0 Beta. It's important to remember that JSF is a specification, much like J2EE. And like J2EE, there is a reference implementation from Sun, along with other implementations of the interface, such as the open source MyFaces. This article is concerned with the distinctive features of the JSF specification and its ideas, not with a particular implementation. After all, since JSF is not yet final, the specifics might yet change.
        

  11. Java server Faces Goals
    The following design goals represent the focus of JSF development:
    Create a standard GUI component framework which can be leveraged by development tools to make it easier for tool users to both create high quality GUIs and manage the GUI's connections to application behavior. 
    Define a set of simple lightweight Java base classes for GUI components, component state, and input events. These classes will address GUI lifecycle issues, notably managing a component's persistent state for the lifetime of its page. 
    Provide a set of common GUI components, including the standard HTML form input elements. These components will be derived from the simple set of base classes (outlined in #1) that can be used to define new components. 
    Provide a JavaBeans model for dispatching events from client-side GUI controls to server-side application behavior. 
       

  12. Core JavaServer Faces - $38.49
    JavaServer Faces promises to bring rapid user-interface development to server-side Java. It allows developers to painlessly write server-side applications without worrying about the complexities of dealing with browsers and Web servers. It also automates low-level, boring details like control flow and moving code between web forms and business logic.JavaServer Faces was designed to support drag and drop development of server-side applications," but you can also think of it as a conceptual layer on top of servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSP). Experienced JSP developers will find that JavaServer Faces provides much of the plumbing that they currently have to implement by hand.
       

  13. Store-Java
    Buy two books direct from O'Reilly and get the third free by using code OPC10 in our shopping cart. This deal includes books from our partner publishers No Starch, Paraglyph, PC Publishing, Pragmatic, SitePoint, and Syngress. All orders over $29.95 qualify for free shipping within the US. In this insightful book, SQL expert Stephane Faroult offers SQL best practices and relational theory that force you to focus on strategy rather than specifics. The Art of SQL is not a cookbook, listing problems and giving recipes. Instead, it aims to encourage you to raise good questions, saving countless hours in the long run. 
       

  14. Ant: The Definitive Guide, Second Edition
    Soon after its launch, Ant succeeded in taking the Java world by storm, becoming the most widely used tool for building applications in Java environments. Like most popular technologies, Ant quickly went through a series of early revision cycles. With each new version, more functionality was added, and more complexity was introduced. Ant evolved from a simple-to-learn build tool into a full-fledged testing and deployment environment. Ant: The Definitive Guide has been reworked, revised and expanded upon to reflect this evolution. It documents the new ways that Ant is being applied, as well as the array of optional tasks that Ant supports. In fact, this new second edition covers everything about this extraordinary build management tool from downloading and installing, to using Ant to test code.
     

  15. Professional Bookstore
    McGraw-Hill Trade is a publishing leader in business and investing, management, careers, self-help, consumer health, language reference, test preparation, sports and recreation, and general interest titles. McGraw-Hill Trade's diverse roster of best-selling series include International Marine, Ragged Mountain Press, Schaum's Outlines, VGM Careers, The Sporting News, VOX foreign language references, the NTC dictionary series, and much more. McGraw-Hill/Osborne Media is a leading publisher of self-paced computer training materials, including user and reference guides, best-selling series on computer certification, titles on business & technology, and high-level but practical titles on networking, programming, and Web development tools. McGraw-Hill/Osborne Media is the official press of Oracle, Corel, Global Knowledge, J.D.
        

  16. Mastering JavaServer Faces 
    This innovative book arms you with the tools to utilize JavaServer Faces (JSF), a new standard that will make building user interfaces for J2EE? applications a lot easier. The authors begin by painting the architectural big picture?covering everything from the Patterns that are used in the implementation to the typical JSF Request/Response lifecycle. Next, you?ll learn how to use JSF in the real world by uncovering the various pieces of the JSF component model, such as UI components, events and validation. The authors then explain how to apply JSF, including how to integrate JSF user interfaces with the Business Tier and how to render your own user interface components. By following this approach, you?ll be able to confidently create and validate your own custom applications that meet the needs of your company. 
        

  17. More Servlets and JavaServer Pages
    The Java 2 Platform has become the technology of choice for developing processional e-commerce applications, dynamic Web pages, and Web-enabled applications and services. Servlet and JSP technology is the foundation of this platform: it provides the link between Web clients and server-side applications. But the field has been evolving rapidly, and few developers have been able to keep up. In this companion to the worldwide bestseller Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages, Marty Hall shows you how to apply recent advances in servlet and JSP technology. The book provides everything you need to know to leverage the latest servlet 2.3 and JSP 1.2 standards: real-world insight, advanced techniques, industrial-strength code, and hands on coverage of three top servers: Apache Tomcat, Macromedia JRun, and New Atlanta ServletExec.
       

  18. Powell's Books - JavaServer Faces
    JavaServer Faces, or JSF, brings a component-based model to web application development that's similar to the model that's been used in standalone GUI applications for years. The technology builds on the experience gained from Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages, and numerous commercial and open source web application frameworks that simplify the development process. In JavaServer Faces, developers learn how to use this new framework to build real-world web applications. The book contains everything you'll need: how to construct the HTML on the front end; how to create the user interface components that connect the front end to your business objects; how to write a back-end that's JSF-friendly; and how to create the deployment descriptors that tie everything together. 
       

  19. Java Server Faces Visual Tutorial
    In this tutorial we have created new JSF components all the way from scratch to a deployable package. In this example, we have covered the major points you will need in order to create any JSF component. However, our example does not show all of the aspects of JSF component building. You now have just the basic knowledge. If writing JSF components is going to be your job, you will need to learn more before you will become an expert in this area. If your component accepts data entered or selected by the user, you need to take care of encoding or decoding the date. Such a component might need to support validators, value changed listener, data converters.
      

  20. Using JavaServer Faces Technology in JSP Pages 
    The page author's responsibility is to design the pages of a JavaServer Faces application. This includes laying out the components on the page and wiring them to backing beans, validators, converters, and other back-end objects associated with the page. This chapter uses the Duke's Bookstore application and the Coffee Break application (see Chapter 35) to describe how page authors use the JavaServer Faces tags to 
    Layout standard UI components on a page
    Reference localized messages
    Register converters, validators, and listeners on components
    Bind components and their values to back-end objects
    Reference backing bean methods that perform navigation processing, handle events, and perform validation
       

  21. Designing Web App Navigation with JavaServer Faces
    Consider what happens when the user of a web application fills out a web page. The user might fill in text fields, click on radio buttons, or select list entries. All of these edits happen inside the user's browser. When the user clicks a button that posts the form data, the changes are transmitted to the server. At that time, the web application analyzes the user input and must decide which JSF page to use for rendering the response. The navigation handler is responsible for selecting the next JSF page. In a simple web application, page navigation is static. That is, clicking a particular button always selects a fixed JSF page for rendering the response. You have seen in Chapter 1 how to wire up static navigation between JSF pages in the faces-config.xml file.

           


 

 

 

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Posted on: April 1, 2008

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