Home Programming Books FreeBSD Books
Questions:Ask|Latest

 
 

Share on Google+Share on Google+

FreeBSD Books

Advertisement
FreeBSD Developer's Handbooks These are some questions which this chapter tries to answer. Of course, programming has different levels of proficiency like any other trade. For some it is a hobby, for others it is their profession.

FreeBSD Books

       

  1. FreeBSD Developer's Handbooks
    These are some questions which this chapter tries to answer. Of course, programming has different levels of proficiency like any other trade. For some it is a hobby, for others it is their profession. The information in this chapter might be more aimed towards the beginning programmer, but may also serve to be useful for the programmer taking her first steps on the FreeBSD platform. To produce the best UNIX-like operating system package possible, with due respect to the original software tools ideology as well as usability, performance and stability.
      

  2. FreeBSD Handbooks
    Welcome to FreeBSD! This handbook covers the installation and day to day use of FreeBSD 5.4-RELEASE and FreeBSD 6.0-RELEASE. This manual is a work in progress and is the work of many individuals. Many sections do not yet exist and some of those that do exist need to be updated. If you are interested in helping with this project, send email to the FreeBSD documentation project mailing list. The latest version of this document is always available from the FreeBSD web site (previous versions of this handbook can be obtained from http://docs.FreeBSD.org/doc/). It may also be downloaded in a variety of formats and compression options from the FreeBSD FTP server or one of the numerous mirror sites. If you would prefer to have a hard copy of the handbook, you can purchase one at the FreeBSD Mall. You may also want to search the handbook.
       

  3. Comprehensive Guide to FreeBSD
    This book is designed for the new user and new system administrator of FreeBSD. This was written to help those who have no real UNIX background easily get started using FreeBSD. No matter what application, whether as a desktop system, or installed as a Internet server, FreeBSD has the power and the flexibility required to meet even the most demanding situations. FreeBSD, however, requires more of an administrative approach than most over-the-counter operating systems. Yet, because of this approach, FreeBSD requires less administration per functionality than Windows 95 and certainly several other operating systems. Given the correct approach, managing a FreeBSD system is simple and can be quite fun. 
      

  4. FreeBSD Install Tutorial
    FreeBSD is a work in progress, continually developing and improving. A release is a stable snapshot of the development process. It is given a version number followed by -RELEASE. There are several releases to choose from, each providing unique opportunities for stability and innovation. Currently there are three different lines of development. 
    2.1.X-STABLE
    The development on this branch has all but stopped. Only security and bug fixes make it in to this branch. The last verstion of this branch was FreeBSD-2.1.7.1-RELEASE. There will be no more versions of this branch.
    2.2.X-STABLE
       

  5. Configuring Network Interface
    A network interface is a device that allows you to communicate with your network. These devices could be a network card, or a modem, or a variety of different pieces of equipment that allows communication. These devices need to be configured so that the network knows who you are. These interfaces will be configured to use TCP/IP networking protocols. This is usually setup in the /etc/rc.conf, or /etc/sysconfig if you have a 2.2.1 or older system.TCP/IP is the protocol used for network communications by FreeBSD. Of course, TCP/IP is also the protocol used to communicate over the Internet, meaning FreeBSD can be used on the Internet ``out of the box''. This chapter will attempt to give you a brief overview of the TCP/IP protocol, and what you need to understand in order to configure your FreeBSD machine for use on a TCP/IP network.
       

  6. Frequently Asked Questions for FreeBSD 2.X, 3.X and 4.X
    This is the FAQ for FreeBSD versions 2.X, 3.X, and 4.X. All entries are assumed to be relevant to FreeBSD 2.0.5 and later, unless otherwise noted. If you are interested in helping with this project, send email to the FreeBSD documentation project mailing list <freebsd-doc@FreeBSD.org>. The latest version of this document is always available from the FreeBSD World Wide Web server. It may also be downloaded as one large HTML file with HTTP or as plain text, PostScript, PDF, etc. from the FreeBSD FTP server. You may also want to Search the FAQ.
       

  7. PPP-Pedantic PPP Primer
    This is a step-by-step guide for configuring FreeBSD systems to act as a dial-up router/gateway in a Local Area Environment. All entries may be assumed to be relevant to FreeBSD 2.2+, unless otherwise noted. The User-Mode PPP dialer in FreeBSD Version 2.2 (also known as: "IIJ-PPP" ) now supports Packet Aliasing for dial up connections to the Internet. This feature, also known as "Masquerading", "IP Aliasing", or "Network Address Translation", allows a FreeBSD system to act as a dial- on-demand router between an Ethernet-based Local Area Network and an Internet Service Provider. Systems on the LAN can use the FreeBSD system to forward information between the Internet by means of a single dial-connection.
      

  8. The Free Corporate Networkers Guide
    The FreeBSD Corporate Networker's Guide is excerpted here with the permission of the publisher. No part of it may be further reproduced or distributed without the publisher's express written <Chanda.Leary-Coutu@awl.com>. The other chapters of the book covers topics such as system administration, fileserving, and e-mail delivery. More information about this book is available from the publisher, with whom you can also sign up to receive news of related titles. The author's web site for the book includes sample code, working examples, errata and a Q&A forum, and is available at http://www.freebsd-corp-net-guide.com/.
      

  9. The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System
    The second chapter of the book, The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System is excerpted here with the permission of the publisher. No part of it may be further reproduced or distributed without the publisher's express written permission. The rest of the book explores the concepts introduced in this chapter in incredible detail and is an excellent reference for anyone with an interest in BSD UNIX. More information about this book is available from the publisher, with whom you can also sign up to receive news of related titles. Information about BSD courses is available from Kirk McKusick.
     

             

 

 

Advertisement

If you enjoyed this post then why not add us on Google+? Add us to your Circles



Liked it!  Share this Tutorial


Follow us on Twitter, or add us on Facebook or Google Plus to keep you updated with the recent trends of Java and other open source platforms.

Posted on: April 1, 2008

Related Tutorials

Ask Questions?    Discuss: FreeBSD Books   View All Comments

Post your Comment


Your Name (*) :
Your Email :
Subject (*):
Your Comment (*):
  Reload Image
 
 
Comments
DMCA.com