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Open Source IRC

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IRC Client Goes Open Source Joing the world of open source is the popular IRC client, ShadowIRC. Version 1.1 is a powerful and full-featured IRC application, and is now in position for continued development, increased stability, and enhanced features.

Open Source IRC

  1. IRC Client Goes Open Source
    Joing the world of open source is the popular IRC client, ShadowIRC. Version 1.1 is a powerful and full-featured IRC application, and is now in position for continued development, increased stability, and enhanced features. According to ShadowIRC developer John Bafford: ShadowIRC 1.1 Moved To Open Source & ShadowIRC 1.0.4 Made Freeware John Bafford, the author of ShadowIRC, reportedly the second most popular IRC client for the Macintosh, has generously decided to open up the development of ShadowIRC under the GNU GPL license. Mr. Bafford is doing this in hopes of seeing a faster development of both the ShadowIRC client software, and ShadowIRC plug-ins software. In addition, he is making ShadowIRC 1.0.4 freeware as a service to the Macintosh community, whom he feels should have at least one free Macintosh IRC client.
      
  2. What is IRC?
    Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is one of the most popular and most interactive services on the Internet. Sure, the Web is nice for finding info and E-mail beats snail mail hands down, but when you've been wondering 'where the others are?', then IRC is what you're looking for. IRC is the net's equivalent of CB radio. But unlike CB, Internet Relay Chat lets people all over the world participate in real time conversations. IRC is where the Net comes alive Using an IRC client (program) you can exchange text messages interactively with other people all over the world. Some of the more popular chat clients are mIRC, Pirch, and Virc for Windows and Homer or Ircle for Mac's. What program you use doesn't really matter; all of them connect to the same chat networks. When logged into a chat session, you "converse" by typing messages that are instantly sent to other chat participants. 

  3. IRC, the Open Projects Network
    Open Source, Open Technology, and Open Information. Sounds like a winning combination to us. so we chased down Rob "lilo" Levin for an interview. Find out about Rob's reading list, favorite ice cream, and oh yeah, a little thing called the Open Projects Network. Linux.com recently had the privilege of speaking with Rob "lilo" Levin, founder of the Open Projects Network. OPN is home to, among others, irc. linux.com (see Linux.com Live! for more details). Rob was gracious enough to answer all of our questions in depth, even the ones regarding food choices. OPN is doing some fantastic work for the community, and we recommend checking out its homepage or logging on to irc. open projects. net to find out how you can help.
       
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Posted on: March 19, 2008

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