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Media Edition 1.0.4 Beta 2 has been released now

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The first public development release (beta2) of Wolvix Media Edition is finished. Notes: the cheatcodes now respond to wolvix instead of slax ; there is no longer one module pr.

Media Edition 1.0.4 Beta 2 has been released now

The first public development release (beta2) of Wolvix Media Edition is finished. Notes: the cheatcodes now respond to wolvix instead of slax ; there is no longer one module pr. Slackware package, the module count reached over 200, and it made the system sluggish and slow to boot; Freevo is included, but it only has a basic configuration, you may need to edit the files in ~/.freevo to suit your needs; Fluxbox is back; this release is still BETA, but should for the most part be fairly stable and polished.

Wolvix is a GNU/Linux live CD built from SLAX. It's a desktop oriented distribution made to fit the needs from regular to advanced desktop users.
This edition features an office and a groupware suite. There's also multimedia, graphics, network and webdevelopment applications. In addition to the applications there's a handfull of games coupled with a DOS and a SNES emulator.
It uses the Xfce Desktop Environment. "Xfce is a lightweight desktop environment for various *NIX systems. Designed for productivity, it loads and executes applications fast, while conserving system resources."

With Desktop Edition you can easily find and listen to internet radio streams; watch videos in different formats including DVD; communicate with others using IM, VoIP and video; create and host your own website; write documents, create spreadsheets and multimedia presentations; connect to exchange serves; create bitmap and vector graphics. When you are tired of doing all that you can play some of the native games provided, or some oldschool DOS and Super Nintendo Games using the emulators.

I want you all to give this beta a good test run, there are quite a few applications I'm not able to test fully because I don't have all the hardware/devices needed, and I don't know how to really use some of the more complex programs, such as Cinelerra, ardour and JAMin.

1. If you have a TV tuner card please test all the TV applications.
2. If you are on dialup connections such as modem and ADSL give the new dialup GUI tools for PPP PPPoE and PPPoA connections a try.
3. If you know how to stream audio and/or video, please see how the Soma Suite, icecast and VLC media player works in this regard.
4. If you have a portable Mp3 player like iPod, or Creative MuVo/Nomad/Zen, test the GUI frontends gtkpod, MuVon and Gnomad2.
5. If you have a DV video camera, see if the Kino video editor can pull video from your camera.
6. Give the release a general test by ripping CDs and DVDs. Play your favorite music and videos using the media and music players.
7. Let me know if there are any programs you are missing that you think should be included.

Note
1. The cheatcodes now respond to wolvix <option> instead of slax <option>
2. There is no longer one module pr. Slackware package. The module count reached over 200, and it made the system slugish and slow to boot.
3. Freevo is included, but it only has a basic configuration, you may need to edit the files in ~/.freevo to suit your needs.
4. Fluxbox is back! =)
5. This release is still BETA, but should for the most part be fairly stable and polished.

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Posted on: February 21, 2008

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Davin
October 26, 2012
dbCBUtmskhzbRJ

Installing software on Linux is acaltluy a ton simpler (assuming it's in the repositories, slax's Modules are probably these). On most distributions, installing/uninstalling software involves nothing more than checking/unchecking a box next to its name in the package manager. Admittedly, if you want something that's not in the repositories, then it does get very complicated, but that's not due to Linux as a system, but rather the choice of software developers for Linux not to package their programs as a .deb or .rpm.Those that do chose to turn their apps into .deb's or .rpm's make installing exactly as simple as Windows, you download and double click the file, and it does the rest for you.The inherent advantage to Linux's method is that updates can be found for every single piece of software on your computer at once, and installed automatically and without version-clashing errors every time. Also, uninstalling is complete and dependencies are (unless you're in Gentoo) automatically taken care of. The disadvantage is that it's unusual for Windows folks, and has the inherent problem that if your computer loses power during an update or an install, anything that was being worked on is permanently broken.But hey, it's how it is, I personally prefer it.
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