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Text Editors
Posted on: July 26, 2006 at 12:00 AM
An common alternative to using an Integrated Development Environment (see IDEs) is to use a text editor, then compile and run the program using Sun's Java Software Development Kit (SDK).

Java Notes

Text Editors

An common alternative to using an Integrated Development Environment (see IDEs) is to use a text editor, then compile and run the program using Sun's Java Software Development Kit (SDK). Many programming editors provide some means of compiling and running Java programs from within the editor.

jEdit
Description: A nice editor written in Java. Quite full featured with a plugin architecture that has inspired a lot of people to write some very useful plugins. The only real problem I've had is printing.
Comment: My favorite. Perhaps not quite as good yet as some of the for pay editors, but well on the way. I'm always eager to support open source Java software. This doesn't require any sacrifices to do so.
License: Free, open source.
URL: jedit.sourceforge.net
TextPad
Description: A popular shareware editor. Interfaces to Java. Install after installing Java and you can compile and run Java programs from within TextPad.

Set the line number option and tabs to 4 spaces (Configure: Preferences: Document Classes: Java: Tabulation).

Turning runtime assertion checking on in TextPad Go to Configure > Preferences... > Tools > Run Java Application. Set the value in the Parameters text field to -ea $BaseName . "-ea" is the abbreviation for Enable Assertions.

License: Nagware. You can use the full editor for free, but you will see reminders to pay.
URL: www.textpad.com

UltraEdit
Description: Another popular shareware editor.
License: 45 day free trial. $35
URL: www.ultraedit.com
EditPlus
Description: Does Java, Perl, C++, spell check, ...
License: shareware, $10, trial version
URL: www.editplus.com
Copyleft 2003 Fred Swartz MIT License
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