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This book is a tremendous achievement. You owe it to yourself to have a copy on your shelf.

C and C++ books-page9

     

  1. The C++ Thinking second edition
    This book is a tremendous achievement. You owe it to yourself to have a copy on your shelf. The chapter on iostreams is the most comprehensive and understandable treatment of that subject I?ve seen to date. Thinking in C++ patiently and methodically explores the issues of when and how to use inlines, references, operator overloading, inheritance and dynamic objects, as well as advanced topics such as the proper use of templates, exceptions and multiple inheritance. The entire effort is woven in a fabric that includes Eckel?s own philosophy of object and program design. A must for every C++ developer?s bookshelf, Thinking in C++ is the one C++ book you must have if you?re doing serious development with C++.
       
  2. An Introduction  Function Pointer Tutorial
    Function Pointers provide some extremely interesting, efficient and elegant programming techniques. You can use them to replace switch/if-statements, to realize your own late-binding or to implement callbacks. Unfortunately - probably due to their complicated syntax - they are treated quite stepmotherly in most computer books and documentations. If at all, they are addressed quite briefly and superficially. They are less error prone than normal pointers cause you will never allocate or deallocate memory with them. Function Pointers are pointers, i.e. variables, which point to the address of a function. You must keep in mind, that a running program gets a certain space in the main-memory. Both, the executable compiled program code and the used variables, are put inside this memory.
       
  3. A Tutorial on Pointers and Arrays in C
    If you want to be proficient in the writing of code in the C programming language, you must have a thorough working knowledge of how to use pointers. Unfortunately, C pointers appear to represent a stumbling block to newcomers, particularly those coming from other computer languages such as Fortran, Pascal or Basic. To aid those newcomers in the understanding of pointers I have written the following material. To get the maximum benefit from this material, I feel it is important that the user be able to run the code in the various listings contained in the article. I have attempted, therefore, to keep all code ANSI compliant so that it will work with any ANSI compliant compiler. I have also tried to carefully block the code within the text. That way, with the help of an ASCII text editor, you can copy a given block of code to a new file and compile it on your system. I recommend that readers do this as it will help in understanding the material. 
      
  4. Introduction to OOP Using C++
    This tutorial is a collection of lectures to be held in the on-line course Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ . In this course, object-orientation is introduced as a new programming concept which should help you in developing high quality software. Object-orientation is also introduced as a concept which makes developing of projects easier. However, this is not a course for learning the C++ programming language. If you are interested in learning the language itself, you might want to go through other tutorials, such as C++: Annotations by Frank Brokken and Karel Kubat. In this tutorial only those language concepts that are needed to present coding examples are introduced. And what makes object-orientation such a hot topic? To be honest, not everything that is sold under the term of object-orientation is really new. For example, there are programs written in procedural languages like Pascal or C which use object-oriented concepts. But there exist a few important features which these languages won't handle or won't handle very well, respectively.


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Posted on: October 8, 2010

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