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Before there was C++ there was C. Developed at Bell Laboratories in the early 1970's, C was used for over 95% of the code in the UNIX operating system kernel. By the end of the 70's, C compilers were available for most mini and microcomputers.

C and C++ books-page3

     

  1. C for C++ programmers
    Before there was C++ there was C. Developed at Bell Laboratories in the early 1970's, C was used for over 95% of the code in the UNIX operating system kernel. By the end of the 70's, C compilers were available for most mini and microcomputers. Superior to BASIC for applications requiring efficient code generation, C became the de facto standard for application software development on mini-computers and that new phenomenon, the PC. Meanwhile, Bjarne Stroustrup, a Bell Labs research computer scientist, released a prototype language called ``C With Classes.'' In C++, one uses classes to structure the system into components. Most of the functions in C++ are members of a class, and thus tightly related to the class's objects. However, C++ also supports free functions: functions that are not part of a class.
      
  2. The C Language Tutorial
    This section contains a brief introduction to the C language. It is intended as a tutorial on the language, and aims at getting a reader new to C started as quickly as possible. It is certainly not intended as a substitute for any of the numerous textbooks on C. The best way to learn a new ``human'' language is to speak it right from the outset, listening and repeating, leaving the intricacies of the grammar for later. The same applies to computer languages--to learn C, we must start writing C programs as quickly as possible. A  C program contains functions and variables. The functions specify the tasks to be performed by the program. The ``main'' function establishes the overall logic of the code. It is normally kept short and calls different functions to perform the necessary sub-tasks. All C codes must have a ``main'' function. 
      
  3. The C library Reference Guide 
    Welcome to the C Library Reference Guide. This guide provides a useful look at the standard C programming language. In no way does this guide attempt to teach one how to program in C, nor will it attempt to provide the history of C or the various implementations of it. It is merely a handy reference to the standard C library. This guide is not a definitive look at the entire ANSI C standard. Some outdated information has been left out. It is simply a quick reference to the functions and syntax of the language. All efforts have been taken to make sure the information contained herein is correct, but no guarantees are made. This guide is divided into two sections. The first part, "Language", is an analysis of the syntax and the environment. The second part, "Library", is a list of the functions available in the standard C library. These parts were designed to insure conformity among various implementations of the C language.
     
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Posted on: February 14, 2008

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